Monthly Archives: June 2013

How to Protect Your Home From Wildfire in Phoenix, AZ

prevent-wildfire-phoenixIf your home abuts a Natural Area Open Space (NAOS), an alleyway or a natural wash Fire Abatement, clean ups should be scheduled on an as needed basis to prevent potential wildfires from spreading to your property and home.

In the desert, It takes very little water for Native Plants to spring forth, mature and set seed for the next rain. While a lush desert may be beautiful to look at, it can become a real and very dangerous fire hazard for your family, pets, and home when the heat dries the Arizona vegetation up. Maintaining a 30 foot defensible space beyond your property’s perimeter is highly recommended.

phoenix-wildfire-preventionIn NAOS areas, for the first 15 feet, remove perennial grasses, thin live overgrown trees and bushes. Remove dead branches or branches touching the ground. In the next 15 feet remove any dead vegetation that is on the ground.

Check outside of your perimeter wall or fence at least once a quarter to make sure that the 30 foot defense space is still there. If weeds & debris are accumulating in the NAOS, alleyway, or wash it’s wildfire-arizonatime for a clean up. In most cases, the city is responsible and all you need to do is make a phone call the proper people in charge. In other situations it is the homeowners responsibility to maintain a defensible space. In either case, it is very important to make sure that you are aware of the potential dangers and precautions you can take to prevent wildfires in you property.

 

Month of June Promotion

Pre Monsoon Tree Trimming
Thinning of canopies prior to Monsoon Season helps wind pass through decreasing the chances of breakage or trees going down.

$40 Off jobs totaling $360 or more!*

*Must be in our Service Area. One coupon per customer. May not be combined with other offers. Expires 7/31/2013.
CONTACT US TO LEARN MORE.

 

Bougainvillea – Plant of the Month June

bougainvillea-bush-1Bougainvillea (part of the Nyctaginaceae family), sometimes referred to as bougies are Native to South America, but do extremely well in our climate. Although frost sensitive they are incredibly hearty and can recover even when they look hopelessly burned by cold. Just prune them back after all danger of frost has past, you should see new growth fairly quickly after pruning.

Plant in a location where they will be at LEAST five hours of sun a day. They will grow in areas with partial shade but, the less sun they receive, the less color they will produce.

bougainvillea-plant-3Bougainvillea come in white, fushia, orange, purple, light pink and white. Don’t be afraid to prune aggressively when needed, this plant can take it. Just be sure to wear long sleeves and gloves as these plants are thorny.

They can be purchased in vine or bush form. There’s also a variety called Torch Glow that
produces color along cane like branches. Torch Glow is outstanding in its natural form, but also can be trained into more formal and colorful hedge as shown in the first picture.

Bougainvillea have a rest cycle in between bloom periods, but bloom year round. Oddly enough the flower is not the showy part of this plant. It’s the bracts that turn color and put on the show. The bougainvillea-tree-2flower is small, white or off white, and located in the middle of the bract as shown in the 2nd picture.

Overfed and over-watered Bougainvilleas produce an abundance of green foliage at the expense of the colorful bracts. After planting fertilize early in the plant’s second spring. After that, if it is vigorous and colorful, feed no more than once every other spring. The exception being potted Bougies. As with all potted plant material, a regular fertilization program should be followed for best results.

 

Month of June Promotion

Pre Monsoon Tree Trimming
Thinning of canopies prior to Monsoon Season helps wind pass through decreasing the chances of breakage or trees going down.

$40 Off jobs totaling $360 or more!*

*Must be in our Service Area. One coupon per customer. May not be combined with other offers. Expires 7/31/2013.
CONTACT US TO LEARN MORE.

 

Phoenix Landscape Maintenance To Do List for Month of June

Turf / Grass / Lawn

lawn and turf tipsPlant Bermuda lawns during the active growing season, May through August Fertilize Bermuda grass lawns with Nitrogen each month beginning late April or early May according to the directions on the fertilizer package. Apply Iron once a month according to the directions on the fertilizer package. Apply one inch of water per week to Bermuda lawns. Once every two or three years dethatch Bermuda lawns if necessary. Only dethatch during the active growing season, May through August. This enables the turf to quickly recover.

Roses

Cut back on fertilizing established roses to encourage plants to slow down for the hot summer. Water deeply as temperatures climb. Hose off plants in the early morning to increase humidity and control spider mites.

Vegetables

Plant Seeds: Armenian Cucumbers, Melons (Cantaloupe, Muskmelon), Sun- flowers. Plant Transplants: Sweet Potatoes

Landscape Plants

agave plant tipsIncrease water application as the weather warms. June is the driest month. Pay attention to irrigation needs of plants. Apply mulch to the ground around heat sensitive plants keep the roots cooler and prevent evaporation. Apply chelated iron to bottle brush, pyracantha, silk oak, and other plants with iron deficiency symptoms. Prune palms when flower spathes show or delay pruning until after the palm has finished flowering to prevent infestation of Palm Flower caterpillars. If palms are pruned in the spring, leave the top five rows of peels so the caterpillars have a place to hide. Cut off spent blooms to stimulate rebloom. Native and imported heat tolerant plants can be planted right through the sum- mer months. They will need to be watered on a regular basis until fall. Trans- plant palms in the heat of the summer for best results. If you have previously had a problem, apply around the base of Agaves a pesticide labeled for use on grubs in order to kill the grubs of the Agave Weevil.

Don’t List . . . DO NOT expose citrus and other sun sensitive plants to sun- burn by pruning during the summer.

Source: AZ Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County, The University of Arizona College of Agriculture & Life Sciences & Goodman’s Landscape Maintenance, LLC.

 

Month of June Promotion

Pre Monsoon Tree Trimming
Thinning of canopies prior to Monsoon Season helps wind pass through decreasing the chances of breakage or trees going down.

$40 Off jobs totaling $360 or more!*

*Must be in our Service Area. One coupon per customer. May not be combined with other offers. Expires 7/31/2013.
CONTACT US TO LEARN MORE.

 

Month of June Tips and Climate Information for Phoenix, AZ

dust-storm-chase-fieldIn 2008 the National Weather Service decided to take the guesswork out of the monsoon start & end dates. June 15th became the 1st day of the monsoon, and Sept. 30th become the last day.

During the monsoon season, Arizona experiences high winds, blowing dust & severe down- pours commonly resulting in flash floods, run off damage & downed or damaged trees.

Although it is not a guarantee that damage won’t occur, thinning tree canopies prior to the monsoon can help protect them from damage by high winds.

Goodman’s Landscape offers professional tree thinning, after storm clean ups & runoff damage repair that you can depend on.

Landscaping Tip For the Month of June

June is probably the most difficult period for many plants because of the long days, high temperatures, and low humidity. Ineffective water management is the number one cause of death of landscape plants in the Valley, and, believe it or not, it is more frequently from over watering than under watering. You can reduce your water bill and take better care of your plants it you water slowly (prevents run off), deeply (use a soil probe or a long handled screwdriver to check that the water is penetrating 2-3 ft. deep for trees and shrubs, and 1- 1 1/2 ft. deep for turf & flowers), and infrequently (Let the soil dry between water- ing).

Climate Information for June in Phoenix, Arizona Rainfall:
Average: 0.1 inches
Record: 1.7 inches (1972)

Temperature (degrees F):

Average High: 103.5 degrees Lowest High: 68 degrees (1899) Record High: 122 degrees (1990)

Average Low: 72.9 degrees Highest Low: 93 degrees (1990) Record Low: 49 degrees (1908)

Note: Rainfall and temperatures vary widely within the valley depending upon elevation and microclimate.

Source: AZ Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County, The University of Arizona College of Agriculture & Life Sciences & Goodman’s Landscape Maintenance, LLC.

Month of June Promotion

Pre Monsoon Tree Trimming
Thinning of canopies prior to Monsoon Season helps wind pass through decreasing the chances of breakage or trees going down.

$40 Off jobs totaling $360 or more!*

*Must be in our Service Area. One coupon per customer. May not be combined with other offers. Expires 7/31/2013.
CONTACT US TO LEARN MORE.